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Old 25-11-2011, 06:24 PM
Bookcook Bookcook is offline
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Join Date: Nov 2011
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Default Rotated ribs and worried

Hi,

After experiencing sudden pain in my back I ended up having xrays.

I've been diagnosed with slight cervical kyphosis, although cervical vertebrae and disc spaces appear normal.
Slight mid thoracic scoliosis, although lumber vertebrae are correctly aligned.
And arthritis

My big concern is that I now have rotated ribs. Which the doctors tell me has occured over time. I cant help wondering if i mayhave been exercising incorrectly, as I was doing a lot of torso twisting moves for some months.

Also about a year and a half ago I cracked a rib in a fall and wonder if that was a precurser.

Are the rotated ribs attributed/exascerbated by the scoliosis? They are very painful and I my gp doesn't know. My chiro has been treating me for a couple of weeks and there is only slight improvement. Is surgery a possible consideration? Or should I be patient as this didn't happen overnight and it will take sometime to rectify?

Thanks
Worried
  #2  
Old 28-11-2011, 03:31 PM
Dr Scoliosis Dr Scoliosis is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 187
Default Re: Rotated ribs and worried

Thank you for your enquiry.

Inasmuch as you have a slight mid-thoracic scoliosis, rotation of the ribs, more noticeable on the convex side, is in fact the anticipated finding. When the spine bends sideways and rotates, which is the essence of the scoliotic deformity, the ribs which attach to the spine follow. The prominence on the back of the trunk in scoliosis when a subject bends forward is not the spine but the ribs. Many subjects have a mild scoliosis and are unaware of the change until some incident leads to an x-ray and so on. A fall does not produce scoliosis. The most common form of scoliosis commences in the growth spurt in early adolescence. I suggest that you look at About Scoliosis on our website for further explanation. If you are concerned you should see a spinal specialist and our website has a directory of qualified practitioners Australia-wide.

I trust this information is helpful.

Dr Scoliosis
 

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