Scoliosis Australia Forums  

Go Back   Scoliosis Australia Forums > Adolescents < 18 years of age > Surgery

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
  #1  
Old 01-10-2011, 03:00 PM
sc0li0tic sc0li0tic is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 12
Default Surgery or no surgery?

I was diagnosed with scoliosis when I was twelve and a half with a 28 degree thoracic curve and a 22 degree thoracolumbar curve. Over the years, I have done gone through two Boston braces and done several x-rays, most of which were with the brace and without it (only taking it off for the x-ray, which didn't give an accuracy of my curve progression).

My most recent x-ray was three days ago and my thoracic curve had increased to 42 degrees and the thoracolumbar didn't look like it changed much (but I have no clue because my specialist didn't measure it). I have been off my Boston brace for nine months prior to this x-ray because I have stopped growing and there was no need for bracing to continue.

I have an appointment/x-ray scheduled in six months time to see if my curves have progressed. Spinal fusion has been on my mind for a few days now. The pain I get from scoliosis is tolerable and I experience it at least once a day. I want to know from personal experience and your opinion on whether or not I should take the surgery, because I would most likely need it if it progresses. Physically, there hasn't been much of a change on my back from three years ago but you would be able to tell that I have scoliosis if I was wearing a bikini.

I will be sixteen on my next appointment and I know it's better to have the surgery when you're younger rather than older. I also wouldn't want the surgery during my final year of schooling which is in 2013. And also I read somewhere that adult idiopathic scoliosis progresses at a 1-3 degree rate each year. I don't want to wait for my curve to reach 50 degrees until I do something about it.

So, what would you do in my position? Tell me about your surgery experience, did your pain go away completely, or did it not make much of a difference?
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 01-10-2011, 07:43 PM
Georgia Georgia is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 23
Default Re: Surgery or no surgery?

Hey again
its a hard decision - I know I kept refusing to have surgery until I had absolutely no choice, but its turned out to be the best thing I have done. I missed out on the first term of grade 11 which was really tough but the school was really good about it. I guess the thing to ask yourself is can you tolerate that pain every single day for the rest of your life? It may get worse or it may go away - who knows, everyone is different. The hardest part about the whole thing for me was having to give up sport for 6 months but now I appreciate it so much more. For the first few months after surgery you will be in pain, but it will get better every day. If you can, get another opinion. For me, my ribcage had rotated to the point where it was starting to impact on my lungs and now with a de-rotated ribcage I can move and run so much better than before, and I look better too (Thats one of the things I loved about the surgery). If I were you I would just keep asking other people, and go and watch some of the surgery videos on youtube - that might help you make up your mind a bit. Aaaanyway I hope everything turns out well,
Georgia
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 01-10-2011, 08:43 PM
sc0li0tic sc0li0tic is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 12
Default Re: Surgery or no surgery?

Haha, hey
I don't know if I could tolerate the pain for the rest of my life because of all the statistics about curves beyond 40 degrees still progressing when you're an adult, and something that I wouldn't want is to have the surgery when I'm older. I don't want to wait until my curve gets to the point where my ribs touch my hips or when I'm in severe pain because it's harder for adults to recover. I would rather just get it over and done with, tbh. But I'm just worried about being in more pain than I originally was :S And yes, I have been watching the surgery videos on YouTube They have been helpful in terms of recovery & etc! And thank you! Also, are you from Sydney by any chance? I just wanted to know who your surgeon was, but I could private message you that I guess, haha.

Anita
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 02-10-2011, 04:23 PM
Georgia Georgia is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 23
Default Re: Surgery or no surgery?

I had my surgery done in Brisbane so I don't think we have the same surgeon. I was told that if I didn't get the surgery (at 65 degrees) that it would just keep getting worse because of gravity or something like that even though I had stopped growing. If it helps, I get absolutely no pain now and I do a lot of things that would have resulted in pain beforehand. If the whole idea of surgery isn't completely devastating to you, then you have a good start at least If I had to go through it all again, I would because the results have been incredible. But keep in mind that there are still some serious risks involved like paralisis etc. and you miss a lot of school and can't do things for a little while. And it hurts for a little while, but morphine takes care of that.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 06-12-2011, 12:38 PM
Nat Nat is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 9
Default Re: Surgery or no surgery?

Hi,
I'm 28 and still haven't had my fusion yet. I have an S curve, the worst being 58 degrees. It is progressing at a rate of 1degree/year.

My advise to you would be that if you feel it is too hard to make the decision right now, then wait til you have finished school. If u don't get too much pain that is. But, make sure you don't get pregnant (I know you are young, I'm talking about the future).

When I got pregnant my curve worsened by 5 degrees. I now have a toddler and due to all the lifting and care my toddler needs I have no choice but to wait til he is older and can look after himself more (doesn't need to be carried etc). This is terrible as I am in severe pain every day and all I can do is wait a couple more years to get my spine fused. My point is that if you were to get pregnant you can't really get your back fixed for about 5 years (unless ofcourse you had excellent support that could look after you and your child while you recover). If I had my time again I would definitely get my spine fused before starting a family.

Life is full of decisions we have to make, only you can make these decisions for yourself. Time and knowledge will help you.

I am sorry you need to have these issues hanging over your head Xx
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT +10. The time now is 04:01 AM.

This forum is a project of

  
Spine Society of Australia

Powered by vBulletin
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.