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  #11  
Old 03-09-2013, 10:23 PM
Kellylaree Kellylaree is offline
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Default Re: What do Mum's do?

How is post operative care going? Are you very tired or is life going back to normal pretty quickly? MAB my daughter may have to have a thoracoplasty as well I am not looking forward to the increased pain if she does.
Are your children wearing a post op brace and if yes was it fitted at the hospital?
Do you have a spinal chair for them to use at home?
Sorry I am not very conversational with my post I am not well at the moment.
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  #12  
Old 04-09-2013, 08:38 AM
Shan Shan is offline
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Default Re: What do Mum's do?

No. No post-op brace for my daughter. And we didn't use a spinal chair. She would just put a pillow behind her back and sit in a normal chair.
Life is 100% back to normal for us but we are 12 weeks down the track. My daughter has returned to her sport, swimming, and has been given the all clear to do the little athletics season, although no jumping events. She's catching the public bus to and from school with no issues. In the last school holidays, four weeks after her surgery, she went shopping with friends and had a sleep over at another friend's house.
I was amazed at how quickly we got back to normal.
Hope you feel better soon.
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  #13  
Old 04-09-2013, 08:48 AM
MAB MAB is offline
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Default Re: What do Mum's do?

Life at home has got back to normal much quicker than I had expected and we have all caught up on sleep. The most intense time was definitely the first 4 days post-op. Once he was off the push-button pain and IV tubes, spinal drain, catheter removed he began to progress quickly. Driving the 45 min trip home from hospital took us back to bringing a new born home from hospital - every bump in the road we felt!
He isn't wearing a post-op brace. He's 2 weeks post-op, but already he's pretty much doing everything for himself now. It took a few days for us all adapt to being back at home. He mainly needed help with dressing himself, and getting comfy in a chair or in bed (he used pillows between his legs/chest etc for support). Now he showers himself fine (still needs help washing his hair), dresses himself (usually needs help with shoelaces but is beginning to attempt that one) and can pretty much do most daily living activities himself. He's able to walk about about a km without too much effort, although needs a long rest after that distance.
In terms of sitting, he doesn't have a spinal chair but the chair he finds he can sit in comfortably is a typical computer desk chair - the padded black swivel kind if you know what I mean! With a pillow added for extra support, he can sit in that for long periods. He struggles with sitting on a sofa or a hard chair.
I'm feeling more human and have pretty much caught up on sleep. Even with the pain meds he's on, he still wakes some nights, mainly because he finds a heat pack helps his rib pain and it needs reheating! There's certainly nothing major that keeps him awake though.
I hope you feel better soon and keep asking those questions. I felt so much more prepared for the op and what was to come by joining this forum.
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  #14  
Old 05-09-2013, 09:28 AM
Kellylaree Kellylaree is offline
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Default Re: What do Mum's do?

Hi Ladies,
Thank you for keeping me posted on your recoveries, I am pleased to hear they are progressing so well and without braces and spinal chairs. Shan it sounds like your daughter was pretty active before the surgery so I think that helps, was your son active too Mab?
My daughter is not very active and I feel this will be her downfall, I try to motivate her into getting fitter and healthier but with her teenage attitude it becomes difficult.
I read that a travel pillow was good for comfort issues post op, so when I came across a memory foam side sleeper pillow (larger version of a travel pillow) I bought it for her it should work well for all the comfort issues.
Like you Mab I am not looking forward to the car trip home...about 3 hours drive from hospital....I guess we will just have to make lot's of rest stops and keep her medication up.
As you can see I am a little more chatty today, a big thank you for your well wishes, after 3 days of sleeping I am starting to feel human again. I haven't had a cold like this in years, really hit me for 6, so glad I got it now though would be terrible to have it at the time of her op or recovery.
Kelly.
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  #15  
Old 05-09-2013, 11:39 AM
MAB MAB is offline
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Default Re: What do Mum's do?

Hi Kelly, no my son is not a keen sportsman - in fact, one bonus of the op from his point of view was having an excuse to get out of sport! He enjoys indoor rock climbing and mountain biking - both of which he has to wait for 9-12 months before returning. He's happy to go out for daily walks though since the op, probably to allay the boredom that is starting to set in! Glad you're feeling better now.
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  #16  
Old 06-09-2013, 11:53 AM
Eliz Eliz is offline
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Default Re: What do Mum's do?

Hi Kelly and others,
Have been reading all the posts and think you are right about the sport. We are now 6 months post op, doing well but still no where near some of those sporty girls! My 16 year old boys favourite sport is online gaming which he is passionate about. That was the first thing to come back and computer chair was just fine.
He had back pain and leg tightness before surgery and was down to competitive tennis only . Was a soccer player and baseballer before that. Always hated swimming.
So, post op it's physio exercises and walking to school, that's about it. I'm sure full recovery will take longer but if the self motivation and interest is not there no amount of nagging helps. They have to work it out themselves I guess.
On another note, who came across the post op/ anaesthetic brain fog that we had?
Simply unable to focus or concentrate for longer than a couple of minutes making catching up on school work near impossible. This did not lift until 8-10 weeks for my son (who is normally very bright I may add). Anaesthetic side effect/ post traumatic stress disorder?
All fine now of course but don't expect too much schooling to get done at home.
First term of year 10 basically skipped,in the long term it's all okay but at the time just another thing to try not to freak out over, it will pass.
Liz
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  #17  
Old 06-09-2013, 07:46 PM
Shan Shan is offline
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Default Re: What do Mum's do?

Yes, my daughter was, and is, extremely active. She trained at swimming seven times a week, about 15 hours, before surgery and is back to six hours a week now, building to eight next week. Her surgeon said her extremely fast recovery was due to her being incredibly fit before surgery (not sure where she gets it from as I am almost completely inactive!!!!).
She is just now back from about 10 hours at the Royal Adelaide Show and is leaping around the house! Her surgeon has said her recovery is not typical so perhaps our experiences are not terribly helpful...
Didn't notice a problem with "brain fog". She went back to school full time six weeks after surgery and was straight back into things. She's a bit younger than than some here. She only turned 13 a couple of weeks before her surgery and is only in her first year of high school (Year 8) so work load not as high as many.
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  #18  
Old 13-09-2013, 10:47 PM
Pegacorn's Mum Pegacorn's Mum is offline
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Default Re: What do Mum's do?

Hi Kellielaree, my daughter just had surgery inMelbourne a few weeks ago. I stayed at the hospital every night except the first night, when she was in ICU. The hospital gave us a great room, with a sofa bed, which I slept on. I helped with some of her care, but she actually preferred the nurses to help her mostly. I took my favourite herbal tea, and the family kept me supplied with chocolate, and I made use of the cafe, just to have a little walk. My husband and older daughter also got me out for little breaks. One we were home, I stayed home for two. Weeks, the we took it in turns to be home until she went back to school. The worst bit for us was when she transitioned to oral drugs, the was really nauseous for 24 hours, which was when we first got home. However, I rang the hospital, and they were great, very helpful. Now, 9 weeks down the track things are so different! Good luck with it all.
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  #19  
Old 16-09-2013, 11:00 AM
Kellylaree Kellylaree is offline
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Default Re: What do Mum's do?

Well we have just over a month till surgery and I am starting to get nervous...thinking I don't know enough, wondering how it is all going to go...so many unknown factors. The time will pass very quickly as we have a lot going on in our lives at the moment and I am feeling like I can't keep up. Better to be busy I guess rather than having time to sit and worry...lol.
How quickly did your children get back into doing a bit of school work?, the school is asking that my daughter try to keep up rather than try to catch up which makes sense but I don't want to push her to much if she is not ready for it. Also did anyone have any issues with their child not coping with the lack of privacy/dignity when needing help to bathroom etc.?
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  #20  
Old 16-09-2013, 08:33 PM
MAB MAB is offline
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Default Re: What do Mum's do?

Hi Kellylaree, its entirely natural to be nervous and apprehensive before the surgery. We've all been there and know exactly how you feel! Time does fly though and it's all over in the blink of an eye.
Its 4 weeks today for us and my son has spent the last week catching up on some school work - although admittedly there's some bribery going on and its the bare minimum! He's also going in to school this week for 3 half days. School is a little tricky as he has a 20 min walk to/from the train station plus the train journey itself - we'll be driving him this week, but he'll need to make his own way in Term 4. I'm really not sure how that's going to go.
Lack of privacy wasn't an issue while he was in hospital and he coped really well. Once he was home and feeling better it became more of an issue, but nothing to be concerned about - it spurred him on to do more things himself.
Keep smiling and keep asking those questions!
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