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Old 02-12-2019, 06:46 AM
Betty01 Betty01 is offline
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Post Is Scoliosis muscular?

Hi all,


I've just recently joined and have a teenage son who has scoliosis and kyphosis and just a terrible posture which is constantly causing him pain and discomfort.


I'm from Adelaide and saw a post on Facebook by a health clinic nearby about how "muscles move bones" and a strained back muscle can be the cause of scoliosis not simply a symptom. Any thoughts?
This seems to make sense toh me as it was only after my son had a sports injury to his back and shoulder muscles that within a few months he had started developing scoliosis.



I plan on getting in touch with them but wanted to know if anyone else has tried something called Hatchard's Way?


The article was here: https://colibrihealth.com.au/blog/18...s-be-muscular?


Thanks
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Old 02-12-2019, 07:57 AM
Christine Christine is offline
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Default Re: Is Scoliosis muscular?

Hi Betty

My sister and I both developed Idiopathic Scoliosis in our pre-teens (both of us had huge surgeries) so the muscles being the culprit doesn't sit well with me. I don't think a true reason for scoliosis will ever be found

Perhaps the muscle injury was due to his developing scoli/kypho.

I'd recommend obtaining a referral from your GP to see a qualified orthopaedic specialist. They will give you the best advice about suitable treatment options.

Perhaps a fellow forum member may see your post and suggest a specialist in Adelaide.

Wishing the best for your boy xxx
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Old 04-12-2019, 09:27 AM
Betty01 Betty01 is offline
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Default Re: Is Scoliosis muscular?

Thanks Christine for your reply.


I've had a couple of friends who have had surgery for scoliosis years ago and haven't gotten much better - still in pain constantly although their spines have been surgically straightened.


So I'd really like to try something for him that isn't permanent surgery. He's a very active boy and loves his sports so that would be so sad if he wouldn't be able to continue with that for years to come.


I think I'll try out this place and then see how it goes. If nothing happens then if anyone could suggest a good orthopaedic specialist that would be great
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Old 04-12-2019, 09:57 AM
Betty01 Betty01 is offline
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Default Re: Is Scoliosis muscular?

I'll let everyone know how it goes with my son. I'll probably try to get him in before Christmas if they're not too busy before then.


Fingers crossed
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Old 06-12-2019, 05:01 PM
nutmeg nutmeg is offline
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Default Re: Is Scoliosis muscular?

Hi Betty

If your son is experiencing a lot of pain, it might be worth investigating the Alexander Technique
More information at the link below
https://www.austat.org.au/

Last edited by nutmeg; 06-12-2019 at 05:11 PM. Reason: Fixed link
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Old 07-12-2019, 09:44 AM
Christine Christine is offline
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Default Re: Is Scoliosis muscular?

It is like a pain-trade (having surgery) and the pain I had before surgery was far worse (I had a horrid, painful hump), along with the depression/emotional distress that goes with being physically deformed

I'd do it all over again and wish I'd had it done when I was in my teens.

My sister has little pain, if any. She started working out and running as soon as she recovered from her surgery as a teen and has done so for 35 years. Her muscle strength is at an athletic level which keeps her pain free. I've just started at the gym again and already I'm less sore. I think that I was in my late 40s when I had my surgery made for a less-speedy recovery.

The few other people I know who have scoliosis (with or without surgery) have pain on some level, but they are all in their 40s onwards. Everything starts to hurt then!

So yes, core exercise and weight control is paramount. Applying Alexander techniques are good too.
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