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  #11  
Old 18-01-2012, 09:47 PM
Rach's mum Rach's mum is offline
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Default Re: Tips to help get through surgery

Kim,

Wishing you and Emily all the best for the 23rd! It is a stressful time but so worth it. I am sure that Emily's quality of life will be so much better afterwards as my daughters has been. It is a joy to see her 'normal' again and pain free - what a difference that has made to all our lives!!
I honestly look back now and realise that all the stress, tears and anxiety and difficulties have been well worth it.
If I can give any advice it would be take one day at a time, take lots of notes, ask lots of questions, and don't forget to pack chocolate (for you) and good coffee if you like a decent cup! If you can stay in hospital with your daughter it is worth the inconvienance, it enabled me to stay on top of her routine, medications and care. The nurses are great but can't be there all the time and you are also around to talk to all the team when they visit the ward each day to get updates, ask questions etc. Rach had a huge team looking after her and they all came at different times. They (our kids) may get grumpy with us at times but they still like their mums to look after them. In fact, I knew Rach was starting to feel a bit better when she started getting grumpy with me!! I found that the experience made Rach and I closer too, we were already but we were 'a team' and got through it together.
As for the car ride, Rach was probably ok to travel that far at about 4 weeks. In fact we did take her out for a drive after she had been home for about a week for a change of scenery. She was really apprehensive about it because of how she felt getting into the car to leave hospital and she thought it would be as bad. We had to really encourage her to go and she enjoyed it in the end. Sometimes you may find you have to encourage them to jump the next hurdle, it is all about them having the confidence to do it. They need to try so they realise they have improved (well that's what Rach was like anyway)
I hope it all goes well and look foward to hearing from you on 'the other side'

Sonia xx
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  #12  
Old 18-01-2012, 10:05 PM
Rach's mum Rach's mum is offline
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Default Re: Tips to help get through surgery

Also....

As for the pain, we really didn't know what to expect either. The pain management team are great and at least in Rachael's case, cared for a scoliosis surgery patient most weeks. They have seen everything and know exactly what they need. There is some pain but it is manageable. Talking to the pain team each day helped me feel more confident that everything was under control. Also don't be shy about asking for her medication - she should be asking for it herself strictly speaking, but I would ask Rach and then call the nurse if she needed something. Nurses get caught up and can forget so it pays to keep track yourself.
Be prepared to help her move position every couple of hours. Learn log-rolling, don't rely on the nurses to do it although you will need their help for the first few days. And make sure she always has lots of pillows handy - Rach needed at least 4, they really help to make them comfortable.

Sonia
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  #13  
Old 25-01-2012, 11:37 PM
Georgia Georgia is offline
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Default Re: Tips to help get through surgery

Hey, just answering your question about the car trip - I had to drive 2 hours home when I got out of hospital about a week after surgery, and I was fine, as I slept the whole way! My only advice would be to have plenty of pillows, and possibly painkillers, and to plan a rest stop about half way where she can get out and stretch a bit I also found that I preffered a car with good suspension, and if you can avoid manuals do - I found a dodgy gear change could hurt a little. But that's just me being fussy - I drove home in a manual and was fine. However, I did make a few long trips in the first few months back to the city where I had my surgery, and some of those trips were in vehicles with bad suspension/ not very much cushioning and I now know every bump on the road between my house and the city :/ anyway, this is getting really long and probably confusing, so definitely stick with pillows and painkillers!
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